Roath Virtual War Memorial: D

EDITH MAUD DAVEY

Civilian Casualty

Edith Maud Davey was born Edith Maud Lewis on 25 Mar 1894 to William John Lewis, a railway labourer and Ada Elizabeth Lewis nee Hawkins, both originally from Cardiff.  The Hawkins family lived at 26 Comet Street in 1911 and Edith worked as a restaurant waitress. She married William Charles Davey, (see below) in Roath parish church (St Margaret’s) Cardiff on 25 Sep 1915. At the time of her marriage she was living at 5 Spring Gardens Terrace.  They had one son, Trevor William Charles Davey born in 1921. She was killed on 18 May 1943 aged 43 when a German bomb fell killing her at 8 Pen-y-lan Road. Her husband died of his wounds from the raid the following day. She is buried at in an unmarked grave at Cathays Cemetery (plot EI 4).  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

penylan road bomb damage

WILLIAM CHARLES DAVEY

Civilian Casualty

William Charles Davey on 19 Nov 1893 at 59 Albert St, Canton, Cardiff to Charles Davey, a labourer, originally from Stoke Abbot, Dorset and Elizabeth Davey nee Salter, originally from Wiveliscombe, Somerset. He was christened on Dec 13 in Canton. In the 1911 census, William is living at home with his parents in Harpur Street, central Cardiff and working as a hairdresser.  He married Edith Maude Lewis (see above) in Roath parish church (St Margaret’s) Cardiff on 25 Sep 1915. At the time he married he was a soldier but we know no details of his military career.  They had one son, Trevor William Charles Davey born in 1921. In 1939 the family are living at 8 Penylan Road and William working as a hairdresser in the shop below.  He was killed on 19 May 1943, aged 49, after a German bomb fell on their house at 8 Pen-y-lan Road killing his wife Edith. He died of his wounds from the raid the following day at the infirmary. They are buried at in an unmarked grave  at Cathays Cemetery (plot EI 4).  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

ARTHUR DAVIES

Private,7th Battalion, Welsh Regiment (Service Number 1408)

Arthur Davies was born on 26 Sep 1895 in Cardiff to Philip Henry Davies, a clerk originally from Maesycwmmer, Monmouthshire, and Charlotte Sophia Davies nee Elias, originally from Abercarn, Monmouthshire. In 1901 the Davies family lived in Diana Street.  Arthur attended Albany Road school and in 1905 represents the school at the city school sports day.  In 1907 he goes on to attend Howard Gardens secondary school.  His father died in Jun 1910 leaving Arthur, the oldest of four children who leaves school in Jan 1911 and works as an office boy at Bute Dry Dock. By 1914 the family had moved to 33 Roath Court Road. He enlisted in the 7th Cyclists Battalion Welsh Regiment. It is unclear what service he saw as his records have not survived. He died at home on 13 May 1915 of sarcoma (cancer) of the face. He is buried in a family grave at Cathays Cemetery (plot B 663). He is remembered on the Howardian war memorial plaque now housed at Howardian Primary school. Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

Arthur Davies grave at Cathays Cemetery

DAVID DAVIES

Private, 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards (Service Number 2955)

David Davies was born in 1898 in Cardiff to Joshua Davies, a ship’s carpenter, from Cardiff and Louisa Davies nee Gould originally from Chilcompton, Somerset.  The Davies family lived at 4 Wimborne Street, East Moors.  Before the war David was an employee of the Gloucester Wagon Works Company  and was goalkeeper for the Moorland Road Boy’s Football team. David Davies was a Private in the 1st battalion Welsh Guards.  He died of wounds received in action on 28 Mar 1918 aged 20 and within 24 hours of his brother Joshua who was in the merchant navy. Their mother learnt about the tragic loss of her two sons on the same day.  He is buried in the Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery in the village of Souchez, France (grave  VIII. Q. 13.). He is remembered on the Splott War Memorial at St Saviour’s church.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

David Davies picture, medal and headstone

Pic of headstone: kindly provided by Steve John, coordinator of West Wales War Memorial Project https://www.wwwmp.co.uk/

JOSHUA SIMEON DAVIES

Steward,  Mercantile Marine,  S.S. “T. R. Thompson”

Joshua Davies

Joshua Simeon Davies was born on 31 Aug 1888 in Cardiff to Joshua Davies, a ship’s carpenter, from Cardiff and Louisa Davies nee Gould originally from Chilcompton, Somerset.  He was baptised at St German’s church in Adamsdown on 2 Oct 1890 and at one time attended  Grangetown Elementary and Junior School.  He married Elizabeth Ann Bryant in 1906 in Cardiff.  They had three children together; Alice (b.1906), Joshua (b.1908) and Beatrice (b.1910) and lived in Barry.  In WWI he served as a steward on board the S.S. ‘T.R. Thompson’.  He drowned on 29 Mar 1918 aged 31 when the T.R.Thompson was torpedoed off the coast of Sussex by U-Boat 57.  The SS T.R.Thompson was on voyage from Benisaf, Algeria to Middlesbrough with 5600 tons of iron ore.  It was sunk seven miles south of Newhaven with the loss of 33 lives.  Three people survived.  His brother David died the previous day whilst serving on the Western Front.  Their mother received the news that her two sons had died on the same day.  Joshua is remembered on the Tower Hill Memorial for merchant seamen and Barry Merchant Navy Memorial created in 1996.  Commonwealth War Graves Memorial record.

HERBERT EDWARD DICKS

2nd Steward, Merchant Navy on S.S. “Bayreaulx”

Herbert Edward Dicks was born in 1900 probably in 77 Alfred Street, Roath as that is where the family lived in 1901.  His parents were Isaac John Dicks, a detective police sergeant, and Martha Jane Dicks née Young.  Herbert Dicks joined the merchant navy and was 2nd steward aboard the S.S. Bayreaulx, which was a steam ship of 3009 tons operated by the Bay Steam Ship Company of Cardiff. He died, presumed drowned, on 20th October 1916 off the south coast of Ireland.  The S.S. Bayreaulx  had been travelling from Cardiff to Montreal carrying ballast, when she was intercepted and torpedoed by U63 under the command of Captain Otto Schulze. All 23 crew members were lost. He his remembered on the Tower Hill Memorial in London for Merchant Seamen.  He was also remembered on the Mackintosh Institute roll of honour, now lost. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission record states his family address at the time as being 13, Diana Street, Roath.

THOMAS DUNN

Private, 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers (Service Number 10869)

Thomas Dunn

Thomas Dunn was born in Roath, Cardiff to Thomas Dunn, a dock labourer from Cardiff and Ellen Dunn née Crimmins, also from Cardiff.  Before the war he worked as a mason’s labourer.  He was killed in action in Vendresse, France on 26 Sep 1914.  He is remembered on the La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial.  His picture appears in the South Wales Daily News on 26 Oct 1914 captioned Cardiff Drummer Killed.  His father is stated as being T Dunn, 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, whose home is at 33 Byron Street, Roath. It has not been possible to ascertain when Thomas Dunn was born.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

HARRY FRANK DYER

 Second Lieutenant 1/6th Battalion Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment), 147th Brigade, 49th (West Riding) Division.

Harry Frank Dyer was born in Bridgnorth, Shropshire in 1886. He became assistant master at Cardiff High School till 1914 and lived at 83 Claude Road.  He is remembered on the Cardiff High School Memorial plaque.  Had moved away from Cardiff by the time WWI commenced and was at Giggleswick School, Yorks.  He died 28th August 1917 aged 31 in northern France. A much more detailed biography of Harry Dyer, written by Gwyn Prescott, is given on the Cardiff High School war memorial page.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.