Roath Virtual War Memorial: P

ANNIE ELZABETH PALMER

Civilian Casualty

Annie Elizabeth Palmer was born on 3 Oct 1929 in Cardiff to Philip William Palmer and Emily Palmer nee Mannings.  She was killed on 29 Apr 1941, aged 13, at 19 Wyeverne Road, Cathays along with his parents and seven siblings (see entry for Philip William Palmer for further details).  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

DOROTHY GERTRUDE PALMER

Civilian Casualty

Dorothy Gertrude Palmer was born on 22 Dec 1925 in Cardiff to Philip William Palmer and Emily Palmer nee Mannings.  She was killed on 29 Apr 1941, aged 15, at 19 Wyeverne Road, Cathays along with his parents and seven siblings (see entry for Philip William Palmer for further details).  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

EMILY PALMER

Civilian Casualty

Emily Palmer was born Emily Mannings on 26 Oct 1896 at 29 Haverlock Street, Temperance Town, Cardiff to William Mannings, a fireman, originally from Cardiff and Emily Gaydon Mannings nee Luscombe also from Cardiff. In 1911, aged 14, she was in foster care in Cadoxton, Barry. On 9 Jan 1917, when she was living at 64 Cairn Street, she married Philip William ‘Bill’ Palmer at St Andrew’s parish church. She was killed on 29 Apr 1941, aged 46, along with her husband and eight of her children at 19 Wyeverne Road, Cathays (see entry for Philip William Palmer for further details).  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

 

EMILY JANE PALMER

Civilian Casualty

Emily Jane Palmer was born on 19 Jul 1924 in Cardiff to Philip William Palmer and Emily Palmer nee Mannings.  She was killed on 29 Apr 1941, aged 17, at 19 Wyeverne Road, Cathays along with his parents and seven siblings (see entry for Philip William Palmer for further details).  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

JOAN MAY PALMER

Civilian Casualty

Joan May Palmer was born on 1 May 1936 in Cardiff to Philip William Palmer and Emily Palmer nee Mannings.  She was killed on 29 Apr 1941, aged 5, at 19 Wyeverne Road, Cathays along with his parents and seven siblings (see entry for Philip William Palmer for further details).  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

 

JOHN FREDERICK PALMER

Civilian Casualty

John Frederick Palmer was born on 3 Oct 1937 in Cardiff to Philip William Palmer and Emily Palmer nee Mannings.  She was killed on 29 Apr 1941, aged 3, at 19 Wyeverne Road, Cathays along with his parents and seven siblings (see entry for Philip William Palmer for further details).  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

JOYCE IRECNE PALMER

Civilian Casualty

Joyce Irene Palmer was born in 1941 in Cardiff to Philip William Palmer and Emily Palmer nee Mannings.  She was killed on 29 Apr 1941, aged 2½ months, at 19 Wyeverne Road, Cathays along with his parents and seven siblings (see entry for Philip William Palmer for further details).  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

LEONARD DAVID PALMER

Civilian Casualty

Leonard David Palmer was born on 29 Jun 1929 in Cardiff to Philip William Palmer and Emily Palmer nee Mannings.  He was killed on 29 Apr 1941, aged 10, at 19 Wyeverne Road, Cathays along with his parents and seven siblings (see entry for Philip William Palmer for further details).  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

PHILIP WILLIAM PALMER

Civilian Casualty

Philip William ‘Bill’ Palmer was born on 9 Sep 1891 in Cardiff to Thomas Jacob Palmer, a plaster and tin plate worker, originally from Bristol and Ann Elizabeth Palmer nee Gregory, originally from Cardiff.  His birth was registered as Philip Palmer but he was baptised Philip William Palmer at St Andrew’s, Cardiff on 3 Dec 1896 when the family were living at 162 Cairns Street, Cathays.  By 1901 the Palmer family had moved to London, living at Parkhurst Road in East Ham but by 1911 they had returned to Cardiff and were living at 17 Coronation Road, Whitchurch.  On returning to Cardiff, Bill had a short spell as a cleaner at Cardiff Railway Station, then became a building labourer.  It appears both Bill and his father Thomas served in WWI for when Bill married on 9 Jan 1917 at St Andrew’s they both give their professions as soldiers with Bill living in the Guards Depot, Caterham at the time.  He married Emily Mannings and they went on to have twelve children together and by 1939, they had settled in 19 Wyeverne Road, Cathays.  Bill was killed on 29 Apr 1941 aged 49 along with his wife Emily and eight of their children when a parachute mine landed a few feet from the Anderson shelter where the family had taken cover.  Parts of the shelter were said to have been found on the roof of a house in Rhymney Street, two streets away, the next day.  One report says that whilst Emily and 7 of the children died in the Anderson shelter, Bill and his eldest son died on fire watching duty nearby.  It is said to be one of the largest individual family losses of the entire war. The family are buried in Cathays Cemetery (Plot EP90) Commonwealth War Graves Commission record. The probate leaves the estate to Charles Henry Palmer, Private in H.M.Forces (appears to be a son, born 1920).

Palmer family, Wyeverne Road, Cathays, headstone, blitz victims

WILLIAM THOMAS PALMER

Civilian Casualty

William Thomas Palmer was born in 1922 in Cardiff to Philip William Palmer and Emily Palmer nee Mannings.  He was killed on 29 Apr 1941, aged 19 at 19 Wyeverne Road, Cathays along with his parents and seven siblings (see entry for Philip William Palmer for further details).  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

ALFRED HAROLD PARFITT

Armourer’s Crew, Royal Navy, H.M.S. Natal. (Service Number: M/13756)

Alfred Harold Parfitt was born on 31 Jun 1896 in Pontypridd to George Alfred Parfitt, an inn keeper and later colliery yardsman, from Pentre and Elizabeth Ellen Parfitt nee Davies from Pontypridd.  After leaving school he was employed as an electrician.  He joined the Royal Navy in Jun 1915 and served on HMS Natal from Jul to Dec 1915. He was lost when the Natal sunk in Cromarty Firth, northeast Scotland on 30 Dec 1915 due to an internal ammunition explosion.  Over 390 people were killed.  Alfred was remembered on a marble plaque that is in the old Unitarian chapel in West Grove, Cardiff.  It is not known if Alfred, aged 19 when he was killed, had any connection with the Cardiff area.  A number of the tablets mention a Pontypridd connection.  Once possibility is that they were moved to the Cardiff chapel when a Pontypridd Unitarian chapel closed.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

Alfred Harold Parfitt memorial plaque


ALEXANDER THOMAS PATERSON

Private, 1st Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)  (Service Number S/9446, 442019)

Alexander Thomas Paterson was born on 12 Aug 1893 in Cardiff to Thomas Paterson, a tailor, originally from Glasgow and Selina Paterson nee Peters originally from Pembrokeshire.  He attended Adamsdown and later Crwys Road school.  He also attended Tredegaville Baptist church.  In 1901 the Paterson family lived at 13 St Peter Street and in 1904 they had moved to Crwys Road.  His father died in 1906 aged 54.  In 1911 the Paterson family had moved again to 69 Shakespeare Street, Roath and Alex was working as a general assistant at a wall paper merchant.  By 1913 he was a fitters mate and a member of the National Union of Railwaymen.   When he enlisted in Perth in June 1915 in the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) he gave his profession as a brakesman.  He was posted to the Western Front and shot and wounded in the right shoulder in Feb 1916 at the Battle of Loos.  On recovering he was transferred to the Labour Corps in Nov 1917. By June 1, 1918 Alexander and  the Labour Corps were serving at the line of the Hohenzoller Sector when Etaples Military Hospital, 15 miles south of Boulogne was bombed by the German forces.  Alex died aged 24 as a result of being wounded in the bombing. He is buried at the Etaples Military Cemetery (grave LXVII. E. 18). He is remembered on the war memorial plaque at Tredegaville Baptist Church and the Cardiff Railway employees Roll of Honour at the Pierhead Building in Cardiff Bay.  Commonwealth War Grave Commission record.

A T Patterson medals and headstone


JOHN STUART PHELPS

Rifleman, 1st/5th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment (Service Number 34067)

John Stuart Phelps was born  on 18 Jun 1887 in Roch, Pembrokeshire to Moses Phelps, a coalminer, originally from Freystrop, Pembs and Frances Phelps nee Childs, a dressmaker, originally from Nolton, Pembs.  He started attending school in Nolton in Apr 1893.  By 1911, then aged 22, he had moved to Cardiff and was working as a draper’s salesman for the department store James Howell’s in St Mary’s Street and living on the premises along with many other people in the drapery trade.  In 1915 he had moved to 5 Piercefield Place, Roath, still working as a draper’s assistant and attended Star Street church where he was a faithful member of the choir. He enlisted in Cardiff in December 1915 into the 7th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, a Territorial Cyclist Battalion. On 26 July 1916 he landed in France, and was posted to the 1/5th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment.  He probably fought in a number of battles at the Somme including the battles of Guillemont, Ginchy and Morval. The division moved to the Ypres salient in October 1916. Stuart was killed in action here on 18 November 1916 aged 29.  He has no known grave but is remembered on the Ypres (Menin Gate) memorial in Belgium and also the Roch War memorial  in Pembrokeshire.  He was also remembered on an individual plaque that was in Star Street church, Cardiff and now believed to be at Parkminster URC church.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

Stuart Phelps - Howell's and memorial

James Howell’s in 1911 (Pic: House of Fraiser archives), Stuart Phelps memorial plaque at Parkminster URC church.


THOMAS JOHN PHILLIPS

Private, 3rd Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Service Number: 404424)

Thomas ‘Tom’ John Phillips was born on 30 Jul 1890 in Pontllanfraith, Monmouthshire to Samuel Phillips, a railway signalman originally from Gelligroes, Monmouthshire and Hannah Phillips nee Walters originally from Ynysddu, Monmouthshire.  By 1900 the Phillips family had moved to 49 Florentia Street, Cathays and Tom started attending Gladstone primary school.  He was a member at Woodville Road Baptist church in 1904. The family moved to 95 Brithdir Street in 1908.  After leaving school Tom worked as a clerk before deciding to emigrate to Canada in 1913 aboard the SS Fanconia that left from Liverpool.  He settled in Toronto and worked as a labourer for the Imperial Oil Company.  When war broke out he enlisted with the 3rd battalion, Canadian Infantry in Apr 1915.  From his enlistment papers we see that he was 5ft 8in, had grey eyes and auburn hair and was a Baptist.  He was killed in action on 18 Dec 1915 aged 24 in Belgium between Lille and Ypres. He is buried at the Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery in Belgium (grave I.E.10.).  He is remembered on the Woodville Road Baptist church war memorial plaque and also the Virtual Canadian War Memorial.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record. His medals went to his friend Birtha Knee in Toronto and his scroll to his father in Brithdir Street, Cathays.

Thomas J Phillips picture and headstone


HARRY LAWSON PICKARD

Second Lieutenant, 9th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers

Harry Lawson Pickard was born in 1886 in Grimsby, Lincolnshire and the eldest of seven children born to John Lawson Pickard, a gardener, originally from Boston Spa, Yorkshire and Jeanettie Pickard nee Bell, originally from Lutton, Lincolnshire.  In 1891 the Pickard family were living in Bingley, Yorkshire and later moved Aberystwyth where his father took up a position as a lecturer of horticulture at Aberystwyth University.  In 1901 Harry was working as a chemist’s errand boy in Aberystwyth before he moved into journalism.  In 1911 he is boarding in Dublin, Ireland and working as a sub-editor. He then moved to Cardiff and started work for the Western Mail.  When he married Phoebe Crosier, a nursing Sister from Stretford, Manchester at St Andrew’s church in Cardiff on 15 Jun 1912 he was living at 31 Crwys Road, Cathays. They had two children together, George Lawson Pickard (b.1913) and Margaret Myfanwy Pickard (b.1916).  The 1914 Cardiff Directory shows H.L.Pickard, journalist, living in Fidlas Road, Llanishen.  After enlisting in the army he served with the Welsh Guards on the Somme before being attached to the 9th Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers where he served as a 2nd lieutenant.  He was killed in the attack to capture the high ground east of Selle on 20 Oct 1918 aged 32. He is buried St Aubert British Cemetery, France (grave I. B. 20.). He was posthumously awarded the Military Cross on 10 Nov 1918, the citation of which reads as follows: ‘For conspicuous gallantry and leadership and devotion to duty during an operation near Bois du Biez on Sept 30 1918. During the attack he led his platoon with great dash, and though early wounded he continued at duty and remained in charge of the outpost line until his company was relieved 18 hours later. His fine conduct had an inspiring effect on his men’.  He is remembered on the Llanelli War Memorial, the war memorial plaque at St Isan’s church Llanishen, and the Western Mail Roll of Honour. His address on his death notice in the newspaper is given as 32 Soberton Avenue, Heath. A piece in the Western Mail from 26 Nov 1918 records how he had written to a friend requesting to be considered for membership of the Carmarthen Antiquarian Society the day before he died.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.   Harry’s son, George Lawson Pickard, studied Physics at Oxford on a scholarship for the sons of WW1 casualties, graduating in 1937 with a D.Phil. During WW2 George served as a Scientific Officer with the British Air Ministry. His work on infra-red detection and bombsight design contributed to anti-submarine attack techniques and the Dam-Busters attacks on the Ruhr Dam. In 1946 he was awarded an MBE for his contributions to the war effort. He later emigrated to Canada where he became a Professor at the University of British Columbia and pioneer in the development of physical oceanography.  He passed away in 2007 aged 93. In recent years, Harry’s granddaughter, Dr Ann McAfee, has donated his Military Cross to the Royal Welsh Fusiliers Museum.

Harry Lawson Pickard picture and meda and headstone


ROBERT CHARLES PITCON

Flight Sergeant (Air Gunner), 635 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve  (Service Number: 1653141)

Robert Charles Pitcon was born in Splott, Cardiff in 1924 to Claud Pitcon, a dock labourer, originally from Falmouth, Cornwall, and Minnie May Pitcon née Wills, originally from Cardiff.  He attended Splott Road school and then Howard Gardens school.  After moving from Splott the family lived at 4 Penywain Road, Roath Park. He served with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve  and was promoted to Flight Sergeant.  He died on 26 Aug 1944 aged 20. His Pathfinder Avro Lancaster III (ND950) took off from Downham Market, Norfolk heading for Kiel, Germany.  It crashed at Struxdorf, Germany, killing four including Picton.  The cause is unknown.  The pilot Lionel Wheble survived.  The casualties were originally buried at Struxdorf, near the Denmark border, before being relocated to Kiel War Cemetery, Germany (Grave 4.E.4) in 1947.  He is remembered on the Howard Gardens High School War memorial plaque. Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

Robert Charles Pitcon portrait and headstone


FRANK PINKARD

Private, 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment (Service Number: 22919)

Frank Pinkard name on memorial at Loos

The name of Frank Pinkard on the Loos Memorial.

Frank Pinkard was born on 7 Sep 1889 in Cardiff to Walter Pinkard, a haulier at an oil merchants originally from South Petherton, Somerset and Mary Pinkard nee Donoghan, originally from Bridgend. In 1891 the Pinkard family were living at 37 Janet Street, Splott. Frank attended Mooland Road school.  In 1901 the family had moved a short distance to 47 Janet Street. In 1911 Frank had left home and was a boarder at 1 Flora Street, Barry and working as a wagon repairer at Messrs Hall, Lewis Co.  He later moved back to Cardiff and worked in Cardiff Docks. He enlisted on 15 Jan 1915 and served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 4 May and a member of the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment. He was killed in action on the 25 Sep 1915 at the age of 26 at the Battle of Loos-en-Gohelle, Northern France.  He has no known grave but his death is recorded on Panel 77-78 of the Loos memorial, ‘Duds Corner’, north of Arras. He is also remembered on the Splott War Memorial.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission record. His brother Walter Pinkard was also killed in WWI.


WALTER PINKARD

Private, 16th Battalion, Welsh Regiment (Service Number: 23120)

Walter Pinkard was born on 4 Nov 1891 at 47 Adleine Street, Splott to Walter Pinkard, a haulier at an oil merchants originally from South Petherton, Somerset and Mary Pinkard nee Donoghan, originally from Bridgend.  He was baptised on 10 Dec 1891 at St German’s church. Walter later attended Moorland Road school.  In the 1901 Census, at the age of eleven, he was living at St Andrew’s Truant Industrial School for boys, Dinas Powys, on the outskirts of Cardiff. Walter was a prominent member of Splott Wesleyan Methodist Church. He went to work as a coal miner in the Neath Valley and on the 1911 Census, at the age of 21, was lodging at 19 Norton Terrace, Glyncorrwg Neath. He married Catherine Kiell, a restaurant worker, on 19 Jul 1914 in Cardiff, with whom he had a son, Walter John, born in the third quarter of 1915.  The child died in the second quarter of 1919.  He enlisted on 1 Nov 1914 and served as a Private in the 16th Battalion (Cardiff City), Welsh Regiment. He was killed in action by a shell in Mametz Wood on 7 Jul 1916 aged 25. He is buried between Caterpillar Wood and Mametz Wood although his exact burial place is not known. Lieut Richards wrote “He was in action on 7 Jul and as we had no news of him afterwards he was posted as missing. News has now reached me that his body was found and buried by another regiment. As you are aware he was a machine gunner, and I am sorry to say that all the men on his gun were either killed or wounded by the explosion of an enemy’s shell”. He is remembered on the Thiepval War Memorial (Pier and Face 4.A).  He is also remembered on the Splott War MemorialCommonwealth War Graves Commission record. His older brother Frank Pinkard was also killed in WWI.


SIDNEY GEORGE PITMAN

Private, 14th Battalion, Welsh Regiment (Service Number: 73077)

St Mellons War MemorialSidney George Pitman was born on 20 Aug 1899 in Highleadon, Gloucestershire to George Thomas Pitman, a waggoner on a farm and later a cemetery labourer, originally from Upleadon, Gloucestershire, and Annie Elizabeth Pitman nee Batchford, originally from Gloucester.   By 1911 the Pitman family were living  at Ty’n-y-brwyn, Coedkernew near Castleton, Monmouthshire.  Sometime in the next few years they moved to 8 Bertram Street, Roath and Sidney worked in the flour mill.  Sidney enlisted in Cardiff on 16 Oct 1916 aged 17 and served in the 14th battalion Welsh Regiment. He departed for France in Apr 1918 and was killed in action on 30 Aug 1918 aged 18.  He has no known burial site.  He is remembered on the Vis-en-Artois Memorial (panel 7) near Arras, France.  He is also remembered on the St Mellon’s war memorial. Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.


GWYNNE GRIFFITHS PROSSER

Private, 11th Battalion, Welsh Regiment.

Gwynne Griffiths Prosser was born to John Prosser, a docks labourer, and Hannah Prosser née Angove.  In 1911 the family were living at 127 Donald Street and Gwynne working as a butcher’s assistant. He married Marie E Chester-Woods in Hastings in 1915.  He joined the 11th Battalion Welsh Regiment and died on 19th January 1916  in Salonika aged 25. He is buried at Lambert Road cemetery just outside Thessaloniki city in Greece.  He is remembered on the Albany Road Baptist Church war memorial plaque.   Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.


HERBERT THOMAS LEWIS PROSSER

Corporal, 11th Battalion, Welsh Regiment.

Lewis Prosser, (brother of Gwynne above) was born to John Prosser, a docks labourer, and Hannah Prosser née Angove.  In 1911 Lewis was a grocer’s assistant. He married Mary Marie Booy from Cardiff in 1915 and they had a son Edward Lewis Colston Prosser. Like his brother he also joined the 11th Battalion Welsh Regiment but died of his wounds on 20 Nov 1916 aged 22 in Salonika, Greece.  He is buried at Karasouli Military Cemetery in Greece.  He is remembered on the Albany Road Baptist Church war memorial plaqueCommonwealth War Graves Commission record.